Travel to Bali with Special Needs Kids

Bali Safari Park

Travel with kids to Bali always needs planning but when traveling with special needs kids this becomes even more important. Our son Mason is autistic and even though we don’t let it stop us from traveling overseas, we often need to consider how we travel more than when traveling with just Charlotte. ASD kids can vary widely in how they react to different situations, something that would trigger a meltdown in Mason may not effect other ASD kids and vice versa. This post is to give tips and tricks from parents of both ASD and other special needs kids. These Mum’s have traveled to Bali multiple times and understand how to get the most out of their holidays even if at times things need to be adjusted. I hope they inspire you to travel with your special needs kids and if you have anything you would like to add please email me or message me through Facebook or Instagram. Happy reading 🙂

Cathy Macguire – Bella Bali Believer

Our daughter Bella nearly 11 has Autism and an Intellectual disability. She was born with complex medical needs. We have been traveling throughout South East Asia since she was 12 months old. We are planning our 16th Bali trip for the September school holidays. I hope what I write here can help other families.

  • Number one trip of a successful Bali holiday is to plan ahead. Look carefully at the different schedules that airlines offer from your closest capital. Cheapest is not always the best choice. Does your airline offer children’s meals? Do they offer in flight entertainment and is there a cost? Will your chosen airline accept your wheelchair? Some aircrafts have restrictions on the dimensions. Is there a facility to charge your device on board, such as a USB Outlet? Do you want to stay in a villa or hotel? Have you chosen your location? Kuta might be great for your neurotypical kids but a nightmare for a child with sensory issues.
  • Don’t tell your child with Autism to far in advance of the holiday. A few weeks before might be the best. Have ready to show them a prepared visual aid, countdown App on their iPad or a social story. Search You Tube for any videos showing procedures around checking in at airports or a video of where you are staying.
  • Make sure your Travel Insurance has the correct cover in the event that you need to make a claim.
  • Double check all medications are in the original packaging with the pharmaceutical label attached. Maybe a Blister pack might be better. Carry a prescription with you in the event that medication is lost of you have to stay longer than planned due to sickness or a natural disaster such a a volcano erupting.
  • Notify your airline at the time of booking if you are taking a mobility device , child seat, CARS harness or a wheelchair. They will need the dimensions of your wheelchair. Not all aircraft types can take all wheelchairs so PLEASE check this first.
  • Pre book your seats at the time of flight reservation. This way there it will be unlikely for a seat change to occur on the day of travel.
  • Pre book children meals and make sure you take a ‘snack pack’ of what ever food your child likes. We pack a big variety including Chips, sweet biscuits, pop corn, lollypops, sandwiches and instant noodles.
  • Check all electronic devices are fully charged. Do you have a spare charging lead and is your portable charger charged. Delays can happen and do often due the nature of the Low Cost Airlines that operate to and from Bali. Bring your own headphones. The ones supplied by airlines are not that great and often are not in the best working order.
  • Now might be the time to have that spare Chewie or comfort toy. Pack a spare one.
  • When packing your hand carry. Make sure that continence aids, wipes and spare clothes are in the one bag. We just use the extra large zip lock bags and place them in the seat back. The one time you forget the spares will be the last time you do.
  • When you check in, if you are not traveling with a mobility device and feel that your child may not cope ask them if you are able to pre-board. This will give you an extra 10 minutes on board to get your self sorted and hopefully ease any stress.
  • Confirm with the cabin manager that assistance has been asked for on arrival. Often this can get lost in translation. Sometimes on arrival your wheelchair can be bought up to the aircraft door on arrival.
  • Remember the cabin crew are there to assist you. Just ask if you need help.
  • Bali can be very busy and at times you may find yourself stuck in traffic for long periods of time. It is very important to choose wisely where you might like to stay. A hotel in Kuta with loud music all day by the biggest pool in South East Asia might be great for your neurotypical children but not so great for your child with Autism.
  • Have you decided on a hotel or villa? Does the hotel have a balcony where your child could climb over or does the villa not have all bedrooms in the same ‘building’?
  • If you child has any sensory needs relating to food bring your own. Weetbix at Bintang supermarket is $10 for a small box.
  • A trip to Bali should be enjoyed by all the family members. Often siblings and parents will want to do activities which are not possible to be done with your child who has Autism. We use Bali’s Best Babysitting on all our trips. We have two regular Babysitters who know our families needs and routines. They will do whatever your family needs done from day trips, Waterbom, accompany kids to kids club, restaurants, beach walks, days by the pool, shopping etc.
  • Try to keep to a strict holiday routine, we use the following:

Breakfast – Swim – Kids Club – Lunch – Swim – Kids club – Quiet time – Dinner

Often our babysitter will arrive after breakfast and some days will stay until after dinner.

  • If doing a day trip plan ahead. Organise a driver that speaks excellent English, preferably one that holds a tourism license and has children. Let him know about your SN child and that you declining a visit for the Monkey Forest is in the best interest of everyone.
  • Make sure you have packed hand sanitiser and plenty of mosquito repellent. And reapply many times throughout the day. Lots of reminders about not drinking the tap water. It might be a good idea to wrap a face washer and tie it with a hair tie around the tap as a visual reminder. Maybe practice at home by washing his or her teeth with a water bottle.
  • The Balinese are beautiful soft and loving people. They will instantly pick up that your child is ‘Special’ and you may find they often comment in that way without you even saying anything. Just smile and say thank you.
Gorgeous Bella in Bali for Christmas 2016

Bron Leeks – Smith’s Holiday Road

We explored Bali as a family of 5 in November 2015. Our kids were 10,7,3 and our eldest son uses a manual wheelchair when we travel. We also got an extra wheel attachment for the front called a freewheel to navigate uneven surfaces. Prior to our trip we organised our Travel Insurance through Covermore as they cover Coopers precasting conditions of Cerebral Palsy and Epilepsy. Never leave home without it!

We split our time between the hills of Ubud and the beach of Sanur with both times staying in private villas for the first time. With both of our accommodations we had a driver and a car organised so that travel was a little easier. Our driver had a big van so we could pop the wheelchair in the back and Cooper would travel in a booster seat. Access around Ubud is really tricky as its hilly and footpaths are often in disrepair so we seemed to walk safely on the side of the road most days. Sanur was mush more flat with easier access from our villa to the shops and beach. There is a really beautiful boardwalk along the beach front.

Even though wheelchair access is hard in many spots the amazing people were always willing to support Coopers inclusion in all activities we experienced.

Smiths Holiday Road
Cooper enjoying the beautiful sites of Bali

Tips from members of Facebook page Autism Parents Australia

  • The one thing I have improved on this trip is I made up a countdown calendar for when we go back to Australia. He keeps wondering how long we are staying. Our son is non verbal.
  • My son religiously referred to his calendar (and clock for flight time) last time we travelled.
  • We have travelled with our ASD twins since they were 8 months as my inlaws live in Italy. We travel every 1.5-2 years and honestly every year it’s been a different experience, different strategy. Plane rides are long, sleeping is stressful I think most of the points are for us parents. Throw your rule book out the window, bring snacks, favour games toys and movies and don’t stress too much. Honestly I’ve always found travel in the long run always seems to open up the kids minds. Most important try and have fun.
  • I use a Yumbox lunch box on the plane for snacks. It doesn’t leak and the bento style takes them longer to eat. We use toddler Tula carriers for the kids on our backs while in transit through airports and shopping centers etc. Check out where the local park/beach/ etc. We try and plan the first day for the kids to wind down and adjust. Some medications taken by kids with autism, ADHD and anxiety are restricted in other countries. Take only what you need for the length of your stay plus a couple of extra in case of delays, keep in the original package. And a letter from the GP stating who it’s for is always a good idea. Bali specific, most pools a private villas don’t have fences, but these can be hired
  • We do a count down where our daughter can mark the days off until we go. I let her help start packing her suitcase 2 weeks before we go (found she’s less anxious this way). We make a book for her the month before telling her about the things we’ll be doing, people we’ll be seeing again etc with pics in it. For the plane ride we make a pack for her & her younger sibling. They don’t get the pack I keep it. I give them one thing at a time every time I see they are getting bored. This time I’ve packed a spinner, fidget cube, colouring in stuff, iPad, iPod (with relaxation music), a couple of new toys, (Shopkins etc. are small & easy to carry) We pack a tackle container with all different foods to keep them chewing, as they have problems equalising. Lap sized weighted blanket. Noise reduction ear muffs (for when you get off the plane). Sounds like alot but it all fits in one little bag to take on the plane.
Lunch box
One of the mum’s lunchboxes that she packs for the flight!

Kate Comer – Rolling Along With Kids

Mason our son is autistic and a sensory seeker which pretty much means he loves movement, spinning, touch and running away. This can mean plane travel is a real headache as he doesn’t sit still for long! We also need to consider what we do and how we do it so we don’t get a dreaded meltdown. Here are my tips for plane travel and holidays in Bali:

  • When I book flights I aim for day flights. It can be very tempting to think overnight flights are best, that they will just sleep but this rarely turns out to be the case and we have an over exhausted child. When I book the flight I select seats at the back of the plane close to the toilets especially if I am flying with the kids by myself. Having a child asleep and the other wanting the toilet is tricky if in the middle of the plane. I also find more of the spare seats are at the back of the plane.
  • Pack LOTS of snacks. Any favourite ones are a must and don’t rely on the fact that if you order a meal your child will want to eat it.
  • Even when Mason was 18mths and had not really used headphones before we still packed them. He will actually watch a movie on the iPad with the headphones plugged into the jack and not wearing them! He constantly wants to have the touch volume control on high but this way it doesn’t disturb other passengers.
  • Make sure the iPad is fully charged and take a power lead too. Often planes will now have a usb port for charging.
  • We do not let Mason out of his seat except if we need to change his nappy. We find it is best to get him watching a movie because if we start to let him run up and down the aisle we wouldn’t be able to get him back in his seat. He also has extra long reach so we have to be wary near the toilets/exits that he doesn’t press buttons or levers that are not to be touched.
  • We always travel with our Mountain Buggy Nano. It folds up as hand luggage for the plane and helps to contain Mason when doing important things like passport control. Lucky we had it last year that we flew to Bali, 1 hour in the line up at immigration!!
  • Nannies to help you are a must to enjoy your holiday and take a must needed break. We have become great friends with Berta, Kadek and Debbie with their amazing ways with Mason.
  • We always choose villas that have an enclosed living area that we can lock and a pool fence. Mason is quite the escape artist with no sense of danger so this extra important. Also hotels that have proper locks that Mason can’t open are such an ease on our mind.
  • Sleeps during the day and down time are a must. I usually have a list a mile long that I would love to do but at times we just have to adjust depending on how he is going that day.
  • We always carry a Lightning Mcqueen back pack with lead to use with Mason if the situation needs it. We can’t always have him in a stroller and he does love to run alot too. I remember before we had kids I’m like why would you use one of those leashes to contain your child and now I completely understand! Safety is always more important to us than what people make think so can be a great thing to take.
  • We always ensure we have more than enough Melatonin for the trip! Without it sleep can be very hard to come by with Mason and can be great to help encourage sleep on the plane.
Bali
Fun times taking selfies at Seminyak Beach 2016

Thanks so much for everyone that contributed to this post. All of your advice is fantastic and I really do hope it inspires others to consider Bali as a destination even with special needs kids 🙂

Kate xx

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